“Sorting the relevant from the irrelevant, identifying salience, and directing decisions when uncertainty prevents definitive judgment.”

More support for bringing the Buddhist notion of “practice” into the practice of effective public leadership:

from Feleppa, Robert. 2009. Zen, Emotion and Social Engagement. Philosophy East & West 59, no. 3 (July): 263-293.

In the past two decades a number of researchers in psychology, cognitive science, and philosophy have converged on a different understanding of the place of the emotions in action, one which emphasizes the important role they play in framing the context of decision making: sorting the relevant from the irrelevant, identifying salience, and directing decisions when uncertainty prevents definitive judgment. I shall argue that this view of the more complex integration of reason and emotion makes clearer why self-liberation is fundamentally a matter of liberation from judgmental habit and inflexibility, and lends support to Hershock’s advocacy of a Mahâyâna view that emphasizes compassionate engagement with others.

Will be worth bringing in more of Lakoff’s take from the neurological/cognitive perspective, to see where it fits with the idea of liberation and the ethics of compassionate engagement.

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